charlesyoung:

Infinitely reflecting section model.  Box details, off & on.

(Reblogged from charlesyoung)

fablesandgables:

Architectural model for the proposed Reading Room of the British Museum - Sydney Smirke and Alfred Stevens, ca. 1853 (made)

Wood, cardboard and plaster: Height: 58.5 cm, Width: 106.7 cm

Following the completion of the British Museum by Sir Robert Smirke (1781-1867) it soon became obvious that space allocated for new books for the library would be insufficient. Two new storage rooms built in the intervening years did not alleviate the problem. The Librarian at the British Museum at the time, Antonio Panizzi, suggested the purchase of further additional land in Russell Square, but this idea was rejected because of the expense. However, in 1852 Panizzi suggested another option accepted by the Museum authorities, that of placing a building in the Museum’s inner quadrangle. Sydney Smirke was the architect of the scheme and the contractors Messrs Baker & Fielder. Panizzi asked Alfred Stevens (whose major works include the Wellington Monument in Westminster Abbey) to design the interior painted and with sculptural decoration but this did not come to fruition. [x]

(Reblogged from fablesandgables)

davidesky2:

Mike Daikubara draws his hotel rooms whenever he travels. Via Urban Sketchers.

(Reblogged from davidesky2)
isthisadrelevanttoyou:

"Photograph of a man placing City Hall in a model of Los Angeles, [s.d.]. The man is pictured at left, leaning from off of what appears to be a gangplank, placing the model of City Hall daintily into place. The model of the city sprawls out in all directions beneath him" (Emphasis added).
“Man placing City Hall in a model of Los Angeles, [s.d.].” USC Libraries Special Collections. n.d. Web. 04 Sep 2014.

isthisadrelevanttoyou:

"Photograph of a man placing City Hall in a model of Los Angeles, [s.d.]. The man is pictured at left, leaning from off of what appears to be a gangplank, placing the model of City Hall daintily into place. The model of the city sprawls out in all directions beneath him" (Emphasis added).

Man placing City Hall in a model of Los Angeles, [s.d.].” USC Libraries Special Collections. n.d. Web. 04 Sep 2014.

(Reblogged from isthisadrelevanttoyou)

The Model Makers: Richard Threadgill Associates

iambettywood:

image

Why, in the age of CGI and 3D printing, are architectural models still relevant? Betty Wood goes to the studio of one of London’s leading model makers to find out. Photography Liz Seabrook

Making architectural models is very Zen. Or, at least it seems to be. Wandering around the workshop of Richard Threadgill Associates, save the occasional high-pitched neeeyhaaaah of a band saw slicing through sheets of wood out back, the studio is a peaceful level of quiet somewhere above silent, but below the buzzing sound of a normal office. I’m reminded of the workshops in a watchmaking factory, where technicians and specialists sit at benches, silently tweezering components into place to the soundtracks of their Discmans.

Read More

(Reblogged from iambettywood)

charlesyoung:

Sketch models.  See them all here.

(Reblogged from charlesyoung)
(Reblogged from hoppenbrouwers)

Just finished a new architectural model and added it to the website for the International Paper Modelers Convention as a free pdf download.

The model is a fanciful rendition of the building in Sterling, VA where the convention takes place. If you’ve been to the convention you might recognize the place:

transitmaps:

ddotdc:

A picture map of the Washington Metropolitan Region, created for the official bicentennial celebration of the American Revolution (1776-1976). Dated 1975. 

Please view a full, high-resolution version of the map.

Image 2: This section of the map gives an overview of the District, as well as listing information about different Metrobus stops and the in-progress Metrorail (which opened in March 1976, just before the bicentennial). 

Image 3: The map gives an up-close look at different sections of the city and inner-ring suburbs, including: Georgetown, Dupont Circle, Southwest, Capitol Hill, and Old Town Alexandria. These special sections point out landmarks such as Howard University, the Library of Congress, the Folger Shakespeare Library, and Rock Creek Park. It also provides information on famous buildings such as the Willard Hotel, the Old Post Office, and the British Embassy. 

Image 4: The last section provides historical details about the District and the surrounding region, including facts about the National Mall, a graph that charts the city’s population growth, and the March on Washington in 1963.

Well, this is just gorgeous (and relevant, as it has a little map of the nascent Metrorail system in the second image).

(Reblogged from transitmaps)

g-x-m:

1949 / 2014
2900 block of West Monroe Street, East Garfield Park
(left photo from Charles Cushman collection)
(Reblogged from g-x-m)